• http://bulletjournal.com/blog/
  • https://zenhabits.net
  • time dorks
  • http://zenpencils.com
  • http://www.rowdykittens.com/new/

on privilege

Yes, cultivate sensitivity in how you relate to different kinds of people, but that’s secondary. If you spend enough time doing these things, the social competence will come naturally. If you don’t get your hands dirty, you are at risk of becoming a politically correct nullity. Spend less time contemplating privilege and more time acting, to be part of the change.

Indulging the sense of intellectual and political superiority that comes from an exquisite acknowledgment of privilege—and the passivity that results—can be its own form of privilege.

from Prospect.org (emphasis added)

for year 50

https://v1.benbarry.com/project/sabbatical-photo-a-day

What would it look like to go deeper?

An interesting alternative to resolutions, similar to Chris Gillabeau’s word of the year:

The focus of my own 2019 Depth Year was to go deeper with my relationships, and let fewer of these worlds pass me by. I focused on reaching out where 2018 David would not have, saying yes when he would have said no, and speaking up in conversations when he would have stuck to the sidelines. I used a simple question as my compass: “What would it mean to go deeper here?”

I need to think about this some more: does it resonate with what i want in my life or is it for a specific  goal?

From Tynan’s Training Yourself (emphasis added)

What happens if you fail? The absolute most important thing is that you don’t use it as an excuse to stop training. If you do this EVER, your brain will figure out that all it has to do is sabotage you once, and then you don’t have to do the challenging new behavior To counteract this, I punish myself by making myself do more the next day. This isn’t a punishment meant to make myself feel bad, it’s just a method of making my brain sabotage-resistant.

If I mess up I don’t get down on myself, either. I note the error, think about what it will take to not make the error again, think about how well I’m doing overall, and focus on the importance of knocking it out of the park the next day to keep momentum up.

Just Transition

Really good read:

Joe Biden Thinks Coal Miners Should Learn to Code. A Real Just Transition Demands Far More.

But my whole point is, I’m looking right now as I’m talking to you, at dozens of wind turbines in Greenbrier County. And they’re building more. These things have to be built somewhere. Solar panels have to be built somewhere. Batteries and the technology that goes along with storing electricity has to be built somewhere. What other, better place to build them then these areas that have no jobs, that have sacrificed everything for this country already, than areas like this right here?

I know for wind turbines, there’s probably a lot of pipe fitting and welding and things along those lines, which miners are good at. As far as solar jobs, I don’t know what it entails exactly, but miners are smart enough to do those things if they’re trained. That’s the only thing I think that Biden was right on in that sense, that they’re smart enough to do some of these jobs with the right training. But to get people to get behind something like the Green New Deal, it’s difficult until you give them something to go on. Build one of these things and hire them, and you’d see them flood to your site. You’d see them flood to these jobs.

Craig Mod

Reading Craid Mod’s newsletter this morning was very interesting and makes me want to follow his work more closely. It also sent me down a bit of a rabbit hole on his site.

  • I like that his archived posts just listing the month — just as useful, less granular
  • thought of an idea to do an annual report via ongoing Flickr uploads — in lieu of Instagram, but as a way to document stuff throughout the year
  • also the idea of a regular newsletter
  • CM’s talks page made me think (again) about collecting my talks into one place.
  • also really like the short and long of his about page

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